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Please visit the original post ——–> HERE 

BL: Loved your enthusiastic scribbling on Bourriaud. I have a problem with your working hypothesis (as usual!?) but like your dauntless crusade!

Where I find you err (!?) is that (1) you assume that the similarities between art and jewelry are what will bring them closer (2) you use as ‘proof’ an example that is particularly unhelpful: Bourriaud’s relational aesthetics texts encapsulates a ‘meaningful departure from the norm’ amongst contemporary art makers: a way of engaging the public that is new, exciting, and representative of larger social concerns. However, while it is new and exciting for art, it is old (and exciting) for jewelry: i.e. jewelry, as you point out, has always relied on a form of public sharing to function. So in my eye, ‘relational’ is not how jewelry becomes more like art, but how art becomes more like jewelry.

KR: I am smiling. And I both agree and disagree with you. Yes, perhaps it is old and exciting for jewelry, but it doesn’t hurt to bring those qualities to the surface and compare it to something so concrete in contemporary art (has it been done?), so that at the very least, dummies who have never thought about jewelry, in its old sense or contemporary sense, can at least take a new kind of pleasure in it, or consider it (even just a tiny bit) to be something bigger and more complex than they ever gave it credit for.

It’s more like, hey everyone, you think this bourriaud relational shit is cool? well guess what: we’ve already been doing that for… ever. so maybe it is worth thinking about, or at the very least enjoying. oh and here’s a whole bunch of jewelry that you’ve never seen before, or even knew existed! you’re welcome. 

BL: I am smiling as well. Comparing is fine, and the way you express it there is more to the point, I think. I would urge you to envisage the possibility that what will make CJ more ‘like art’ is precisely what makes it different from art as we know it.

This dialogue was taken from email correspondance on April 30, 2013. Mr. Lignel is my editor at AJF. 

IF YOU LIKE THIS:

elizabeth renstrom elizabeth renstrom

elizabeth renstrom

elisabeth renstrom

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THEN YOU WILL ALSO LIKE THIS:

mallory weston

 

mallory weston

mallory weston

 

*MWeston1

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appearing first: photography by ELIZABETH RENSTROM <====all photos taken from artist’s website

^(thank you matthew leifheit for introducing her to me through your super awesome MATTE magazine)

second: jewelry by MALLORY WESTON <====all photos taken from artist’s website

please visit the websites to learn more about each artist and their work

MAURIZIO NANNUCCI has given us all a new mantra to live by. N O M O R E E X C U S E S is a light and sound installation at the Fabbrica Europa at the Stazione Leopolda in Florence that opened May third and will be up only until the 11th of the month. The exhibition is part of FabbricaEuropa’s 20th anniversary. If you’re in the area at the time, you should go. 

fabbricaeuropa

Here’s a bit about the foundation:

Fabbrica Europa was born in 1994 from an idea of Maurizia Settembri and Andres Morte Terés with the aim to create a home in Florence for the culture of all Europe. In eighteen years of activity Fabbrica Europa has become a recognised space for new artistic languages and the contemporary arts. Florence is a city historically designated to house art but burdened with the weight of tradition. It is therefore perhaps one of the most difficult places to deliver a project that is not simply a festival but a concept, a hub of international, multicultural, creation and training. By transforming the Stazione Leopolda into a workshop, stage and laboratory of research and experimentation, Fabbrica Europa has given the ex-railway station back to the city, animating a location of industrial archaeology with a new cultural function.

For more info click ——-> here

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The installation is stupenda. Just after entering the venue and passing through a moment of almost pure darkness, I turned the corner and was confronted by this:

n o m o r e e x c u s e s

NO MORE EXCUSES - MAURIZIO NANNUCCI NO MORE EXCUSES - MAURIZIO NANNUCCI

NO MORE EXCUSES - MAURIZIO NANNUCCI NO MORE EXCUSES - MAURIZIO NANNUCCI KELLIE RIGGS MAURIZIO NANNUCCI NO MORE EXCUSES - MAURIZIO NANNUCCI

NO MORE EXCUSES - MAURIZIO NANNUCCI

It ain’t everyday that one gets to walk through such a fantastically transformed space. After turning the dark corner a breath of disbelief is taken then exhaled with amazement when seeing the long room for the first time. A childlike wonder is assumed almost immediately, and you could sense that being shared too.  If I were to speak personally about my own initial impression, the only words that escaped my lips for the first five minutes I think were holy f*ck. It felt like my infantile ideas of what space might be like plus the inside of my brain responsible for self doubt were manifested together in this room, in a slightly mocking, yet delightful way, even gentile. The looming and almost melancholic cool blue lights spelling out, no more excuses across the 100 meter floor that beamed down on me remain to be quite affective even three days later. And I don’t think the necessity I acquired to repeat this mantra over and over in my head will diminish in the future for that mater, by any means. I was challenged by this piece in the simplest of ways, as if Nannucci wanted to offer us all a big and humble favor, reminding us of what’s fundamentally important. I’m grateful, really. The lights could have also spelled, hey dummy, you might want to think about getting your shit together!; a personal message that I felt like I was actually telling yourself, no one else. The universality of this experience could have only left visitors with an echo of their own lingering, suppressed thoughts or doubts, yet with a new feeling of drive and tranquillità; just the right ingredients to prevent feeling too overwhelmed when reentering the real world.  That’s how I felt anyway, and like I said, i’m grateful.

As I was standing under a singular cascading blue light, looking up, I felt like I had to answer to my own doubts, assume responsibility for something. And I am still thinking about it. Do objects have the ability to ignite this kind of everlasting emotional experience? Can they similarly act as physical triggers of big existential questions when relatively experienced, touched, held… worn? It ain’t easy, but perhaps they can.

If you can think of some examples, please comment. I’ll do the same.

NO MORE EXCUSES - MAURIZIO NANNUCCI

Maurizio is seen in the center of this crappy photo on the right of the group. I am lucky to call him a dear friend and neighbor. Thank you for consistently bringing the only dose of contemporary culture to Firenze. 

To learn more about the work, please click —-> here for a statement as well as the artist’s bio

Ann Hamilton at the Park Avenue Armory – NYTimes.com.

“Ms. Hamilton, who represented the United States at the Venice Biennale in 1999, began her career as a weaver, earning a B.F.A. in textile design at the University of Kansas in 1979 before heading for Yale and an M.F.A. in sculpture. (In a sense she is still weaving, but in real time and space, combining objects, language and action so that they intersect suggestively and often poetically.)”

Hello readers! I am pleased to announce a new reoccurring post, Misha Says Angrily, that will feature a short and sweet rant about the designer’s place in the world, or something of the like. Take what you will and maybe think about where we, the art jewelry world, may or may not fit in.

Nov. 11 2012

The hardest part of being a designer is being expected to know a comprehensive amount about art history, design history and craft history – and all these other lazy bitches just learn their own little sphere and carry on ignoring the fact that their entire man made surroundings are dictated by design – while maintaining that their sphere has some sort of intellectual or soulful (respectively) high-ground. I think that to be a designer means to accept this and take on the task of comprehensively regarding all three histories and current states while creating an object that has the additionally difficult task of being somehow usable – in the face of the complete lack of appreciation it will inevitably receive.

Misha Kahn

THE BIRTHDAY BOYS – Thomas Gentille and Peter SkubicGallery Loupe in Montcair, New Jersey, Oct 09 – Oct 30, 2012

the following photos are from the opening on oct. 20th

more info to come about the pieces on display ! 

both artists will be speaking at Brooklyn Metal Works on Oct. 21st. click —–> here for more info!